Synagogue Attacker Who Killed Two Had Planned Far Bigger Massacre – The Wall Street Journal

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A person believed to be the suspect in the Halle shooting is escorted by police from a helicopter at the Federal Court of Justice in Karlsruhe on Thursday.


Photo:

uli deck/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

By

Andrea Thomas,

Sara Germano and

Petra Sorge

BERLIN—The German man detained after a live-streamed and ultimately botched attack on a synagogue that left two dead in Germany’s east was charged with murder on Thursday after what authorities described as a terrorist attack.

As more details about the 27-year-old suspect and his plan emerged, it became clear that Germany had narrowly escaped a far bigger massacre.

Witness accounts, information from authorities, as well as the suspect’s own writings and recorded statements painted a portrait of a determined extremist who was, by his own admission, ultimately thwarted in his plans for globally broadcast carnage by shoddy preparations.

“What we witnessed yesterday was terror,” General Federal Prosecutor Peter Frank told journalists as he unveiled the charges. The accused, he said, “had intended to cause a massacre.”

Mourners gathered at the market square in Halle on Thursday, a day after the attack.


Photo:

hannibal hanschke/Reuters

The man, identified by a security official as Stephan Balliet from the state of Saxony-Anhalt, tried and failed to enter the locked gate of the synagogue in the city of Halle around midday on Wednesday, according to authorities and witnesses.

He then turned around, shooting dead a passerby and killing a patron at a fast-food restaurant, streaming the entire episode on the Twitch online service with a camera fixed to his helmet.

The live streaming of the attack showed the suspect wanted to have a global impact, Mr. Frank said, following the example of recent attackers such as Australian Brenton Tarrant, who allegedly killed 50 at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. He was inspired by others and wanted to inspire others, Mr. Frank said.

In written documents that security experts said they believed Mr. Balliet had posted online before the assault, the suspect describes his motivations, his tactics and the makeshift weapons he had built to execute his attack.

In the documents, written in English and seen by The Wall Street Journal, the author uses familiar far-right tropes, expressing hatred of Jews, Muslims and liberals. The bulk of the documents, however, detail plans to attack the Halle synagogue and the various handmade guns and explosives created for the operation.


‘I will die like the loser I am.’


—The attacker during his live-stream, apologizing for not causing more casualties.

The author lists three objectives: “Prove the viability of improvised weapons,” “Increase the moral [sic] of other suppressed Whites by spreading the combat footage” and “Kill as many anti-Whites as possible, jews preferred.”

Florence Keen, a research fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence in London, said the documents bore similarities to manifestos of other hate-crime perpetrators, including conspiracy theories about alleged threats against white people.

“The end of the manifesto, detailing his ‘achievements’ and tasks, really exemplifies the ‘gamification’ of these kinds of killings,” said Blyth Crawford, a research fellow at the center.

The suspect’s reliance on handmade weapons, including two automatic guns and a shotgun, and sketchy planning seem to have played a role in limiting the toll.

“Our love is stronger than your hate,” read a sign among candles on the market square in Halle on Thursday.


Photo:

clemens bilan/epa/Shutterstock

In a recording of the live-streamed video seen by the Journal, the man can be heard swearing as his guns repeatedly jam and fail to fire. Earlier in the sequence, he expresses surprise at finding the gates of the synagogue locked and frustration after 15 minutes of trying and failing to force his way in.

After the bungled attack, authorities said, the suspect shot dead a woman on the street and drove to a nearby kebab shop where he killed a customer who can be heard on the video crying for his life. The attacker is repeatedly shown aiming at passersby but failing to fire his makeshift guns.

“I will die like the loser I am,” he explains at one point, apologizing to viewers for not causing more casualties.

According to German officials, Mr. Balliet allegedly killed a 40-year-old German woman from Halle and a 20-year-old German man from Merseburg. While officials in Germany usually don’t identify victims, the man was identified by the fan club of local soccer team HFC as Kevin S.

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After a brief shootout with a police car more than 20 minutes into the attack, the suspect drove off, stopping on the outskirts of the city where he tried to swap his car, and shooting and wounding two people in the process, according to a witness.

Kai Henze, 36, owner of an auto shop in Landsberg, east of Halle, said he was working when he heard a shot outside. Two minutes later, a man entered, pointing a gun and saying he was a wanted criminal, had just shot two people and needed a car.

“I threw him the keys of a taxi that I had just here for repair. Then he said ‘I know you will call the police now, but please give me 10 minutes,’ and threw two €50 bills on the street for me and then quickly drove away with the taxi.”

Mr. Henze said he then attended to the two victims nearby, a couple around 40, before calling the police. Mr. Balliet was arrested soon after.

Details of the suspect are slowly emerging.

In Düsseldorf, Germany, a man stands in front of a synagogue holding a sign translated as, “We stand by our Jewish fellow citizens and commemorate the victims!”


Photo:

David Young/DPA/Zuma Press

Ursula Siebenhüner, 68, from the village of Ahldorf, said Mr. Balliet lived alone with his mother, a teacher, in the neighboring hamlet of Helbra.

A German official who declined to be named said Mr. Balliet had been among the last Germans to do compulsory military service before it was abolished. He had served six months to the end of March 2011 in Hagenow, where he didn’t stand out in any way.

Holger Stahlknecht, state interior minister of Saxony-Anhalt, said the suspect wasn’t known to German intelligence agencies before the attack.

A man described as Mr. Balliet’s father told the Bild tabloid that Mr. Balliet had been a loner with few friends and spent most of his time online. “He was always blaming others for everything,” the man said.

Neither Mr. Balliet’s mother nor his father could be reached for comment.

Mr. Balliet faces two murder charges, nine counts of attempted murder and several charges related to other crimes, the prosecutor said.

While the attacker appeared to have acted on his own, authorities said they were still investigating whether he had support or if anyone had prior knowledge of the attack. The suspect was due to appear in the Federal Court of Justice in Karlsruhe later Thursday.

German Justice Minister Christine Lambrecht said the attack had shown that far-right extremism was “one of the biggest threats we are currently facing.”

Write to Andrea Thomas at andrea.thomas@wsj.com and Sara Germano at sara.germano@wsj.com

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